Spray-on caffeine

Spray-on caffeine

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Drinking coffee is the age-old way of staying awake, but now there's a new way to get that jolt. It's called Sprayable Energy, a spray caffeine that's absorbed through your skin.

Co-creator and Harvard student Ben Yu says he created it because coffee gave him too many jitters.

"Nothing really worked for me, but still being tired all the time, it was always on the back burner on my mind that there must be a better solution out there," he says.

The spray is made up of caffeine, water, and an amino acid derivative. It promises a smooth, long-lasting caffeine boost.

But Dr. Joshua Zeichner, a Mount Sinai dermatologist, says if you have sensitive skin, beware.

"Creams that contain caffeine for under-eye circles, or for cellulite, have not been shown to be harmful to the skin," he says. "But I would be cautious in people who have very sensitive skin because you don't want them to develop an allergic reaction to any ingredients in the spray."

The creators claim they've tested it on hundreds of people with no incident.

The product launches in November and is available online.

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