Forecasters monitoring 2 disturbances with high chances of development

The FOX 35 Storm Team is currently tracking three systems, two of which have high chances for possible development in the tropics. 

The first is an area of low-pressure area located a few hundred miles south of the Cabo Verde Islands. It currently has a 90-percent chance of developing.

The National Hurricane Center says a tropical depression is likely to form during the next couple of days while the system moves generally westward across the tropical Atlantic Ocean.

tropics1.jpeg

WEATHER ALERTS: Download the FOX 35 Storm Team Weather app for live radar, severe weather alerts, and daily forecast reports on your phone

Another is a trough of low pressure located a few hundred miles northeast of the central Bahamas, which is producing a large area of disorganized showers and thunderstorms. The NHC says a tropical depression is likely to form while the system moves north-northwestward to northward across the western Atlantic. Chances for development remain high at 70 percent.

tropics2.jpeg

RELATED: Buckle up, Florida: NOAA says September is the most hurricane-prone month

The third system being watched is a tropical wave that is expected to emerge off of the west coast of Africa in a day or two. Right now, chances are low for development at 20 percent. Environmental conditions are forecasted to be conducive for development while the system moves west-northwestward over the far eastern Atlantic.

4584bbd0-Hurricane Frontpage

September 10th was the official peak of hurricane season. So far, there have been 14 named storms. If another one forms, it will be called ‘Odette.’

FOX 35 Storm Team Chief Meteorologist Jayme King previously explains that once the peak of hurricane season passes, typically it means there will be fewer occurrences of hurricanes and tropical storms, but don't put your guard down. 

"We're fair game until November 30th. Stuff can happen and it can happen late in the season," he said.

Watch FOX 35 News for the latest updates throughout hurricane season.